From the Kitchen Floor to the Gallery Wall: A Study of Atlantic Canadian Hooked Rugs and Their Makers

Rebecca Carr
Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice

About this Item

Title
From the Kitchen Floor to the Gallery Wall: A Study of Atlantic Canadian Hooked Rugs and Their Makers
Contributor Names
Carr, Rebecca (Author)
Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice (Degree granting institution)
An Berthon, Magali (Thesis advisor)
Date
2022
Degree Information
M.A. Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York 2022.
Department: Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice.
Advisors: An Berthon, Magali.
Abstract
Since their genesis as a utilitarian method of helping heat the home using fabric scraps and burlap, hooked rugs have been an ever-present part of Atlantic Canadian culture. Throughout Atlantic Canada's four provinces of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, and Newfoundland and Labrador, the history of this craft is evident in museums, art galleries, historic houses, and other cultural institutions. As with so many textile arts, the tradition of rug hooking has been passed down through generations and has evolved as a cultural object along the way. To understand the history and modern presence of rug hooking is to begin to understand the profound impact of the textile arts on Atlantic Canada's culture. Rug hooking has been a domestic task, a paid labor, a joyful pastime, and a contemporary art form. While the techniques of contemporary rug hookers have remained similar to those of past generations, the reason for creating hooked rugs has changed drastically—just as the rugs themselves have moved from the kitchen floor to the gallery wall. This paper presents both the history of rug hooking in Atlantic Canada as well as the contemporary landscape using a multidisciplinary approach that includes field research and interviews with local craftspeople. The institutions that house hooked rugs are also examined, with particular interest in how museums, historic houses, and galleries choose to display the rugs. This paper presents a multilayered study of Atlantic Canada vernacular and craft culture through its resilient community of rug hooking craftspeople.
Subject
Rugs, Hooked
Hooked rug industry
Textile crafts
Textile museums
Textile research
Atlantic Coast (Canada)
Canada--History
Material culture
Rights
In Copyright
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Identifier
FIT Repository ID: lb_sc_000898
pqdiss: 29165189
ISBN: 9798438784487
Type
Text
Thesis
Language
eng
Publisher
Ann Arbor : ProQuest Dissertations & Theses,

Citation

Carr, R. (2022). From the Kitchen Floor to the Gallery Wall: A Study of Atlantic Canadian Hooked Rugs and Their Makers [Master's thesis, Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York]. FIT Institutional Repository. https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/8318
Carr, Rebecca. From the Kitchen Floor to the Gallery Wall: A Study of Atlantic Canadian Hooked Rugs and Their Makers. 2022. Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, Master's thesis. FIT Digital Repository, https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/8318
Carr, Rebecca. "From the Kitchen Floor to the Gallery Wall: A Study of Atlantic Canadian Hooked Rugs and Their Makers." Master's thesis, Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, 2022. https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/8318