The Emergence of Japanese Americans in Fashion: The Triumphs and Legacies of Forgotten Designers, 1939-1965

Zoe Taylor
Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice

About this Item

Title
The Emergence of Japanese Americans in Fashion: The Triumphs and Legacies of Forgotten Designers, 1939-1965
Contributor Names
Taylor, Zoe (Author)
Yanofsky, Anna (Thesis advisor)
Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York. Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice (Degree granting institution)
Date
2023
Degree Information
M.A. Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, 2023
Department: Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice
Advisors: Yanofsky, Anna
Committee members: Davidson, Hilary; Byrd, Sarah; Matheson, Rebecca
Abstract
In the twenty-first century, fashion scholarship has pushed for a more inclusive study of the history of fashion. Although there has been an increased focus on the study of Asian American designers, prior research has yet to account for earlier Japanese American designers that appeared on a wider scale in the mid-twentieth century. Early Japanese American contributors to the fashion industry were present at least almost 100 years ago in the 1930s. Although the internment of 120,000 Japanese Americans stunted the capabilities of this community, those with an interest in fashion were able to unify under a period of duress. The presence of fashion classes and shows throughout internment camps presents a determination for the creation of beauty amid imprisonment. Following their release after World War II, numerous women went to work within the fashion industry and achieved high levels of success, unfortunately all of which are forgotten today. Japanese American designers such as Linda Kinoshita were multitalented, and served many roles such as designer, seamstress, and entrepreneur. The following research resurfaces these successful designers not just among the Japanese American community, but also forms a more holistic understanding of American fashion history. Although unified in aspirations, each of these women created fashion in a unique approach and demonstrated individualistic career paths.
Keywords: American fashion; Asian Americans; Fashion designers; Fashion history; Internment camps; Japanese Americans
Subject
Fashion
Asian Americans--Study and teaching
History
America
Asian Americans
Fashion designers
Internment camps
Japanese Americans
Rights
In Copyright
The copyright for this work is held by its author/creator(s). Usage of this material beyond what is permitted by copyright law must first be cleared with the rights-holder(s). This work has been made available online by the Fashion Institute of Technology Gladys Marcus Library strictly for research and educational purposes. If you are the copyright holder for this work and have any objections to this work being made available online, please notify us immediately at [email protected].
This item must not be sold to any third party vendors.
Identifier
FIT Repository ID: etd_000946
ISBN: 9798379899585
pqdiss: 30522670
Related Materials
Also available from ProQuest
Type
Text
Thesis
Language
English
Publisher
Ann Arbor : ProQuest Dissertations & Theses

Citation

Taylor, Z. (2023). The Emergence of Japanese Americans in Fashion: The Triumphs and Legacies of Forgotten Designers, 1939-1965 [Master's thesis, Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York]. FIT Institutional Repository. https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/120838
Taylor, Zoe. The Emergence of Japanese Americans in Fashion: The Triumphs and Legacies of Forgotten Designers, 1939-1965. 2023. Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, Master's thesis. FIT Digital Repository, https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/120838
Taylor, Zoe. "The Emergence of Japanese Americans in Fashion: The Triumphs and Legacies of Forgotten Designers, 1939-1965." Master's thesis, Fashion Institute of Technology, State University of New York, 2023. https://institutionalrepository.fitnyc.edu/item/120838